Sergio Pistoi, Nanotechnologies
Beauty is in the moth's eyes
Beauty is in the moth's eyes If you wear glasses, you are probably reading this article by looking through a tiny, transparent layer of nanomaterial.
Sander Dorenbos: seeing the (almost) invisible with nano-wires quality - part 1
Sander Dorenbos: seeing the (almost) invisible with nano-wires quality - part 1 Detecting a single photon may seem overkill for most purposes. However, looking at such tiny amounts of light is essential for researchers working  with quantum computers as well as for  chip manufacturers, just to mention two examples.
Floor van de Pavert: seeing the (almost) invisible with nano-wires quality - part 2
Floor van de Pavert: seeing the (almost) invisible with nano-wires quality - part 2 The story began a few years ago, when two scientists from the University of Delft (see related story) developed a way to double the efficiency of currently available single photons detectors.
Clare Arkwright: "Fuelling hopes for unplugged power supplies"
Clare Arkwright: "Fuelling hopes for unplugged power supplies" If you have been left high and dry by your iPad battery and unable to recharge it, you see  the problem. High tech gadgets, electronic appliances and electric cars have a well-know downside: sooner or later, you need to look for a plug - and a power grid- to keep them alive.
Tilmann Leisegang: "Towards a miniature X-ray laboratory"
Tilmann Leisegang: "Towards a miniature X-ray laboratory" More than a century after their discovery, X-rays still claim their place in medicine and science.
François Plais: “A spongy nanomaterial may change the way to monitor water quality” - part 1
François Plais: “A spongy nanomaterial may change the way to monitor water quality” - part 1 Heavy metals coming from industrial waste, such as mercury, lead, cadmium, nickel, and zinc are some of the most dreaded pollutants in water, and EU laws strictly limit their concentration in the water we drink.
Bram van der Gaag: "A spongy nanomaterial may change the way to monitor water quality" - part 2
Bram van der Gaag: "A spongy nanomaterial may change the way to monitor water quality" - part 2 When a group of researchers at the Ecole Polytechnique (EP) in Palaiseau , near Paris, created a new nanomaterial-based sensor for monitoring heavy metals in drinking water, they had to address a ...