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Ireland, Bioeconomy
Could ‘superfoods’ stop disease?
Could ‘superfoods’ stop disease? The importance of healthy eating for our well-being is scientifically proven and having a varied diet goes without saying.
Do microbes control our mood?
Do microbes control our mood? If aliens were to examine a human, they would think we were just slavish organisms designed to feed microbes and carry them around. Our bodies contain ten times more bacteria than cells , and there are an estimated 3.
Food dangers on our 'global' table
Food dangers on our 'global' table About 75% of the new diseases that have affected humans over the past 10 years have developed from animals or products of animal origin.
Early warning system for fish farmers
Early warning system for fish farmers The marine aquaculture sector has grown continuously over the past years, according to the FAO’s world review of fisheries and aquaculture.
Putting the sunshine vitamin in the spotlight
Putting the sunshine vitamin in the spotlight We all get vitamin D in two ways – from our diet and from exposure to the sun.  A lack of this vitamin puts young children at risk of bone diseases like rickets and older children and adults at risk of bone softening .
Grass as the new biofuel
Grass as the new biofuel Grass could be used to produce biofuels. The advantage of using grass crops is that they can be grown in marginal lands that would otherwise not be used .
Sustainably exploiting the sea’s treasure trove
Sustainably exploiting the sea’s treasure trove The barely explored marine environment has already thrown-up a vast treasure-trove of high-value biomolecules .
Tougher climate-resistant crops
Tougher climate-resistant crops Might it be possible to make better plants more quickly than we do today? And without the public objection that accompanies genetic manipulation? Climate change means that this is now an urgent question.
Functional foods from the sea
Functional foods from the sea Seaweeds are not only tasty, but they are a source of nutrients that could be beneficial for health and wellbeing. And like terrestrial plants, seaweeds also contain significant portions of fibre that reach the colon undigested.
A sticky solution against beef bacteria
A sticky solution against beef bacteria If you can't kill them, trap them. Such is the fate that scientists are reserving to pathogenic bacteria, such as the infamous E. coli .
From the horse's mouth: experts views from across Europe
From the horse's mouth: experts views from across Europe It all started when the  Irish Food Standard Authority  realised, mid-January, that some of the burgers sold in the country (and in the UK) contained about 29% of equine DNA, upon testing.
Europe fends off alien species
Europe fends off alien species It may look incredibly innocent, but the harlequin ladybird, a stowaway onboard fruit and flower consignments from Asia, is on a ‘most unwanted’ list.
Food Bug Forensic Tracking
Food Bug Forensic Tracking Pork factories now rely on a new kit to examine suspect meat . The technique was developed in an EU funded project called Biotracer . It relies on maths algorithms to pinpoint the most likely origin of harmful bacteria on meat , such as salmonella.
Profile: Kieran Jordan "Defeating food bug with killer viruses"
Profile: Kieran Jordan "Defeating food bug with killer viruses" Kieran Jordan is a keen amateur historian living in Cork, a county in the south of Ireland.  But his meat and drink is food safety.  Having moved into the area of food science in the 1980s, he has worked through a menu of baddies, studying listeria, E.
Take your medicine – or is it just food?
Take your medicine – or is it just food? EU legislation distinguishes between plant food supplements and traditional herbal medicinal products , but this categorisation can vary between countries. This can lead to consumer confusion and regulatory inconsistency across Europe.
Gluten doppelgänger in the baking
Gluten doppelgänger in the baking All their life, people with coeliac disease relinquish eating food containing wheat, rye or barley. These cereals contain a protein called gluten that is not well tolerated by their body.